custom stationery

Baby | Graduation| Personal & Business Stationery | Social Events | Wedding Printing Methods|Flat (Offset) Printing | Thermography Printing
Letterpress Printing | Engraving

Here at Noteworthy*, it is our priority to provide clients with a wide array of custom stationery choices. From the totally fabulous to perfectly traditional and meeting all the budgets along the way. We carry the best lines your money can buy. Here is a comprehensive list of the albums we offer. If you don’t see what you want, call us, we might just get it for you!

Baby
allie munroe, baby
b.t. elements, modern baby
Prints Charming Paper
Oblation Paper & Press, custom letterpress, baby edition
simplyput by Ashley Woodman, baby [volume 5]

Graduation
Carlson Craft, Graduation Stationery

Holiday
Birchcraft Studios, New Holiday Traditions
Carlson Craft, Personalized Holiday Greeting Cards
Carlson Craft, Photo & Holiday Greeting Cards
Crane & Co., Holiday Cards & Invitations
Crane & Co., Holiday Photomounts
Prints Charming Paper, Happy Holiday Collection
simplyput by Ashley Woodman, holiday [volume I]
Stylart, Strictly Business! Business Greeting Cards
The Happy Envelope, Holiday

Personal & Business Stationery
Betsy Hall, Royal Imprints, Stationery & Invitations
Crane & Co., Personal Correspondence
Chloe B. Stationery, Exclusively for Crane & Co.
Paper and Stuff, McPhersons

Social Events
Betsy Hall, Royal Imprints, Stationery & Invitations
cat seto san Francisco
Envelopments Design Studio
Pioneercolor, life in print, magnets & more
Prints Charming Paper

Wedding
Alice-Louise Press, Wedding Stationery
Carlson Craft, Wedding & Social stationery, favors, accessories, gifts
Chloe B. Weddings, Exclusively for Crane & Co.
Crane & Co., Letterpress Wedding Invitations
Crane & Co., Design Library
Crane & Co., Bliss, new traditions weddings
Crane & Co., Weddings, invitations and announcements, silver album
tag & co., wedding invitation and announcement collection
Chauhi, Beautiful invitations and fine social correspondence
Dauphine Press, The Wedding Portfolio
Delphine, Wedding
Designer’s Fine Press, Wedding
egg press, invitations
Envelopments Design Studio
Birchcraft Studios, Everlasting Love Collection, Wedding Invitations & Accessories
Naturally Ever After, Where Weddings And Nature Meet
Oblation Paper & Press, Wedding edition
Pioneercolor, life in print, magnets & more
simplyput by Ashley Woodman, Wedding social stationery
That Sky Blue, Fine Letterpress Stationery, Wedding Collection
The Happy Envelope, a stationery design company, wedding 2

Printing Methods
Don’t be overwhelmed! Our custom consultations are designed to effectively help you sort through all the choices! One of the major factors in cost and quality is in choosing the right type of printing to match the formality of your event and your budget. Here’s a quick tutorial on the kinds of printing we offer here at Noteworthy*:

Flat (Offset) Printing
Offset printing, also called offset lithography, produces a finished product where the ink is completely flat on the paper with a matte finish. This is the most familiar form of printing today and in most cases it is also the most affordable. The first step in the process is to create a printing plate. An image of the design to be printed is put on the printing plate using a photomechanical processes and the plates may be made of metal, plastic, or other materials, depending on the type of press being used. A different printing plate is created for every product which will be printed (one for the invitation, one for the response card, response envelope, etc). If multiple colors are to be printed on the same product, a different plate would be created for each color in each product. Once the plates are made, the press run can begin. The printing plate is attached to a cylinder on the press, specialty Pantone ink is applied to the plate’s image area, transferred (or “offset”) to rubber blankets or rollers and then to paper.

Thermography Printing
The thermography printing process produces raised printing similar in appearance to traditional engraving but is much more affordable! The process for thermography printing is very similar to offset printing, except that while the ink is still wet, it is lightly dusted with a colorless resinous powder. The paper then passes through a radiant oven system to bake the powder and fuse it to the ink, which creates the raised effect. Because of the resin and heating process added to the ink, colors tend to be a little more intense or vibrant than flat printed colors.

Letterpress Printing
Letterpress is relief printing. This means that a raised surface is inked and pressed into a sheet of paper. This raised surface can be metal type, wood type, a photoengraved plate made of copper, magnesium or photopolymer, a woodcut or wood engraving, or even a carved linoleum block. The original form of printing, letterpress is more than just fine printing. Each individual piece of your order is hand-aligned, hand-fed and printed one color at a time. Years ago, letterpress was virtually abandoned in favor of faster and cheaper printing methods better suited to the mass market. But just as fine cuisine is still appreciated in a world of fast food, fine letterpress printing is still valued for a kind of beauty that can only be created by genuine craftsmen (or women!)

Engraving
Engraved stationery is created using handcrafted steel dies and copper plates. Similar to letterpress printing, engraving is also relief printing. Words and images are cut into the metal, a method similar to that used in manufacturing coins that has changed little since the sixteenth century process of engraving ascended to an art form. After the final hand-cutting of the image, the die or plate is placed into the engraving press. The press quickly inks the plate and wipes off the excess before each impression, while the paper is fed by hand into the impression area one piece at a time. Approximately three thousand pounds of pressure is applied to the paper, which causes the ink to adhere. Each color in a multi-color design requires its own die and a separate run through the press. Careful inspection of the reverse of the paper will reveal the impression area, called a “bruise.” The bruise and the tactile feel of raised matte ink on the front of the paper are the signatures of genuine engraving and help to distinguish it from the many imitation processes.

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